Tuesday, February 7, 2012

Becoming a Social Business? Don't Forget About Social Business Etiquette

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Earlier this week IBM released a new short whitepaper on the behaviors required in a social business. While a lot of companies focus on how employees engage with others outside of the firewall, I haven't seen a lot of discussion of behavior guidelines in social media behind the firewall.

As more and more companies begin their social business transformation, most are testing the waters internally behind the firewall. One of the recommendations that often comes up as part of this transformation is to set up Social Computing Guidelines. However, those guidelines don't focus on the actual behavior and communication patterns employees use daily as they collaborate amongst each other.

Various colleagues came together to put this together. These are probably IBMers that you have already interacted with such as Rawn Shah, John Rooney, Jennifer Okimoto, Jeanne Murray, and Jacques Pavlenyi.

I don't want to give anything away so instead I'll cover the areas of etiquette highlighted in the paper:

  • Etiquette in building relationships
  • Etiquette in interactions
  • Etiquette in responding to others
  • Etiquette in including and acknowledging others
  • Etiquette of mass communications over social networks
  • Risk and governance

How do you know if this paper is for you? From the paper:

This IBM executive brief is for enterprise leaders who seek to understand the critical role that social business etiquette plays in workforce transformation and in adoption of social business programs. It explores professional interactions among colleagues over online social networks inside the firewall, with particular emphasis on colleagues who do not have an established professional relationship.

The paper is about 10 pages long and is very easy to read. If you are leading the social transformation at your organization this is a great asset to have.

To learn more, and download and read the PDF go here: http://ibm.co/SocBizEtiquette

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